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Starting the New Year Right with Reframing Resolutions 2021

As 2020 drew to a close, we asked our fellow travelers on the Reframing Aging Initiative Caravan to share with us their resolutions for the new year, either by sending them to us or by sharing them on social media using the hashtag #ReframingResolutions21. We offered some suggested resolutions that they could adopt (or adapt) as their own, or they were free to come up with their own. We’d like to thank everyone who resolved to take action to advance reframing aging in the new year and move us ever closer to ending ageism.

In 2021, I resolve to:

Inspire my coworkers to reframe their communication about aging. – Susan Donley, LeadingAge

Include explicit instructions in my classes on the best language to use when speaking or writing about older adults and aging society. – Nancy Morrow-Howell, Washington University in St. Louis

Engage in thoughtful dialogue with family, friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. I especially hope to find ways to bridge the conversation to colleagues and clients whose work focuses on other issues. – Kelly A. Laflamme, Consultant

Emphasize the fact that we become more different from each other as we age. – Trish D’Antonio, The Gerontological Society of America

Consistently educate my friends and peers about the power of language and why older people deserve inclusive terminology and empowering frames and messages. – Robert Espinoza, PHI

Make framing research more responsive to the needs and questions of actual on-the-ground communicators. And make framing research results and recommendations more accessible and usable to those in the position to use them. – Nat Kendall-Taylor, FrameWorks Institute

Embrace my own aging proudly and start calling out ageism when I see or hear it. – Cynthia Banks, American Society on Aging

Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age” – Jackie Rivera, Humana

Call out ageism in the various ways and places that we discuss DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion).  Not only is ageism an important concept to guard against, it also is a magnifier of the other “-isms” that some people face throughout their lives.  – Rani Snyder, The John A. Hartford Foundation

Embrace my own aging proudly. – Mari Nicholson, The SCAN Foundation

Professionally, make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. And on a personal level, embrace my own aging proudly. – Karen Peffer Brown, Changing the Narrative CO

Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and racism and how when combined systemically create disparities and inequities affecting communities of color. – Lynn Fields Harris, Consultant

Start calling out ageism when I see or hear it and think of the social justice issue of elder abuse as a problem with solutions. – Julia Schoen, National Center on Elder Abuse

Embrace my own aging proudly. – Cheryl Kimball, Huggins Hospital

Celebrate the gift of older age and support the message of strength of years by never buying and presenting birthday cards that make fun of the older person and the “so-called plight” of many years. –Claire Cote, Connecticut Department of Aging and Disability Services

Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. – Antron Watson, AARP Massachusetts

Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Vanessa M. Jimenez, Massachusetts Department of Human Services

Call out ageism when I see or hear it and engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. I think these two go together, as it brings up helpful conversations. And make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. – Tracey Colagrossi, National Council on Aging

Use/support inclusive language, thoughtfully developed programs and policies in 2021. – Franki Martin, Presa Community Center, San Antonio, TX

Keep elevating, within my organization, conversations about ageism. – Linda Schotthoefer, United Way of Miami Dade

Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and family about ageism to educate on its impact since we’re all aging. – Diana McFail, NextFifty Initiative

Continue to use more inclusive language and phrases when describing “all of us as we age.”  —John Beilenson, SCP

Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. Request implicit bias training at my workplace. – Rebecca Sky, New Hampshire State Commission on Aging

Call out ageism when I see or hear it. – Jane Carmody, The John A. Hartford Foundation

Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. – Karen Kolb Flude, City of Chicago Family & Support Services

Embrace my own aging proudly. Stop buying and giving birthday cards that make fun of older people. Incorporate “building momentum” in my writing. – Martha McLeod, New Futures

Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Mary Lou Ciolfi, University of Southern Maine

Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” – Wendy Silveira-Steinway, HR Consultant

Stop introducing issues about aging by calling out “crisis” demographic statistics without explanation or context. Embrace my own aging proudly. Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Susan Ruka, Memorial Hospital/MWV Adult Day Center

Incorporate “building momentum” in my writing. Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” — Hannah Albers, National Lutheran Communities & Services

Call out ageism in social settings. – Alrie Daniels, Tufts Health Plan Foundation

Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” – Maria Jackson, Grantmakers in Aging

Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Beth Kowalczyk, Ohio Association of Area Agencies on Aging

Stop introducing issues about aging by calling out “crisis” demographic statistics without explanation or context. And embrace my own aging proudly. – Cec Ortiz, Project Management Consultant

With a new team member coming on board next week to manage volunteer involvement and program development, we will design and make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. – Martha Tecca, CommunityCare of Lyme, NH

Incorporate building momentum in my writing. Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. – Marcus Escobedo, The John A. Hartford Foundation

Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” Avoid using the term “senior” or “elderly,” particularly in situations referring to a wide range of older people including those in their 50s and 60s. Emphasize the fact that we become more different from each other as we age. Stop using large age groups to describe older adults, as if everyone 60+ is the same. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Jill Piazzi, Geriatric Care Management and Consulting

Incorporate building momentum in my writing. Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. – James Fuccione, Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative

Emphasize the fact that we become more different from each other as we age. Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” Call out ageism when I see or hear it. – Sabrina E. Noel, PhD, RD, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Request implicit bias training at my workplace. Embrace my own aging proudly. – Synthia Mitchell, Springfield Partners for Community Action

Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. Make the argument for a policy position based on the need to ensure that all of us can participate fully in the life of our families and communities, using language that evokes justice for all. – Catherine Taylor, Age-Friendly Rhode Island

Embrace my own aging proudly. Stop buying and giving birthday cards that make fun of older people. Start using inclusive language and phrases when describing older people, for example, “all of us as we age.” Emphasize the fact that we become more different from each other as we age. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. – Roxie Severance, New Hampshire Health Care Association

Make the argument for a new aging program based on its innovation and ability to enable more of us to contribute to our families and communities, using language that points to the exciting and dynamic aspects of the new idea. Call out ageism when I see or hear it. Engage in thoughtful dialogue with friends and colleagues about ageism and how it affects us. Request implicit bias training at my workplace. – Jennifer Rabalais, New Hampshire Alliance for Healthy Aging

About Us

The Reframing Aging Initiative is a long-term social change endeavor designed to improve the public’s understanding of what aging means and the many ways that older people contribute to our society. This greater understanding will counter ageism and guide our nation’s approach to ensuring supportive policies and programs for us all as we move through the life course.

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Contact Us: reframingaging@geron.org

Follow us on Twitter: @ReframingAging

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